Gardening

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Tizer
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tizer » 13 Jul 2020, 09:12

Maybe it's a problem in Australia but not here in the UK, Cathy. The flowers are an important source of nectar for bees late in the year when fewer other plants are flowering. It also provides cover for many nesting birds. Of course it can be a problem if allowed to grow over a house but that shouldn't be done in the first place. Also there are ivies with lovely variegated leaves and they can make good ground cover.

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Re: Gardening

Post by Cathy » 13 Jul 2020, 10:14

Flowers on Ivy ? , never seen that, or bees and birds . The Ivy in my garden comes from a neighbours garden, all
very nice if it can be contained. The runners underground are a good metre long, and can be extended in two or three different directions, and take a lot of strength to pull out. It pops up all over the place and strangles smaller plants in it’s path. It’s invasive and if you haven’t planted it, you don’t want it. OK in pots that can be controlled.
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tizer » 14 Jul 2020, 09:54

To get flowers,as shown below, the ivy needs to be a mature shrub. It flowers late in the year and is often covered in bees. It can be a nuisance when the stems force their way fence through the gaps between fence panels and send out runners below the fence into next door's garden. It's best grown away from a fence, or on one that doesn't have a neighbour's garden next door.

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Re: Gardening

Post by Cathy » 14 Jul 2020, 11:14

Looks like a Hedera helix genus. I read that it needs to be mature to flower, and maturity may not be reached for 10 years or so, or not at all.
I’ve never come across flowering ivy. Quite a few Ivy’s I looked up said they are a declared pest or weed.
The Ivy I had removed (hopefully for good) was stretching about 6 metres, way too much for a small garden.

Sorry I’ve just read again what you said about maturity.
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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 15 Jul 2020, 03:28

That head on the right looks like a virus!
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tripps » 15 Jul 2020, 13:53

These are from next door's front garden. thought they were worth a photo. Not sure what they are called, but I think he said the big one was Mrs Someone's Ghost. I'd say they were dramatic - click twice for best effect.. The big bumble bees love them. :smile:
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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 16 Jul 2020, 03:16

Striking blossom David, you're right, well worth a pic.
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tizer » 16 Jul 2020, 10:17

It's sea holly, Eryngium. There are many different types. A lovely, striking plant and it will grow in poor soil. LINK
This must be to one your neighbour has... Miss Willmott's Ghost

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Re: Gardening

Post by Tripps » 16 Jul 2020, 12:14

Thanks for that. I was hoping someone would do the research. I didn't know where to start. :smile:
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tizer » 16 Jul 2020, 16:07

Mrs Tiz confirmed the ID for me straight away, it's one of her favourite plants. Coincidentally we went to the local nursery this afternoon for bags of bark and I saw they had several species on sale. It's native to the UK and seen mostly on shingle beaches and sandy areas. There are several ornamental cultivars now. We like the ones with bright blue flowers. Bees love it too! :smile:

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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 17 Jul 2020, 02:41

That's noted. Sounds like an ideal candidate for my almost maintenance free front garden.
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tizer » 20 Jul 2020, 10:19

I can recommend this unusual version of the snapdragon. It has a different flower shape and flowers for a long time. The bees like them, especially the red flowers. Almost every time I look there's a bumble bee on the red ones!
Antirrhinum majus 'Madame Butterfly' F1 Hybrid, Half-hardy Annual LINK
As they say, available from all good seed sellers!

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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 21 Jul 2020, 03:10

My dad was a big fan of Antirrhinums when he took up gardening in later life.
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tripps » 16 Aug 2020, 13:56

This is a picture of the offspring of the begonia cutting that I blagged from 'them next door' a while ago. Nearly taking over the kitchen table now. These cuttings were taken in a cold January, and just rooted in water with no real hopes of success. :smile:

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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 17 Aug 2020, 02:24

Do they live there permanently?
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tripps » 17 Aug 2020, 10:58

Stanley wrote:
17 Aug 2020, 02:24
Do they live there permanently?
No - They were in the porch, but it's South facing like a mini hot house, and they went all 'Amazon jungle' on me. There are another two or three cuttings waiting to go, but you can have too much of a good thing. :smile:
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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 18 Aug 2020, 03:51

I thought they might hamper breakfast....
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Re: Gardening

Post by Tripps » 19 Aug 2020, 10:46

Stanley wrote:
18 Aug 2020, 03:51
I thought they might hamper breakfast....
Indeed - but like most I rarely use the table - and I think the candlelight suppers will be a long time off. :smile:

I looked up, Angel Wing Begoniasand was disturbed to see that they can exceed six feet high in a season. I'm potting the cuttings today - can't resist something for nothing.
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Re: Gardening

Post by Stanley » 20 Aug 2020, 04:48

Hee hee! Triffids!
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