DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 31 Jan 2020, 03:38

Morning Cloggy! Very nice to hear from you. Are you well? Glad my post reassured you....
Thanks for that David. Another LKF for the back of my head! It must have a very good management system when you think of all the stuff that's packed away in there.... No wonder I dream so much, it must be sorting itself out every night. It will be put to the test this morning, I am expecting a call from David Govier ("I work at Manchester Central Library. We are the North West hub of a national project called Unlocking Our Sound Heritage. The aims of our project are to digitise and catalogue 5,000 tapes from across the NW region at Manchester, and to provide access to digital copies of the tapes at their holding institutions or online at the British Library's website. The project is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund and co-ordinated by the British Library.")
I expect questions.....
This is the man who said what a great resource the site is and I shall be pressing him to give us a billing in any material they put out.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 01 Feb 2020, 13:14

A couple of interesting words on this blog site. As plugged in the new parish magazine.

Stargoose and hanglands

He's quite a photographer too. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 01 Feb 2020, 17:08

That's another spooky thing (or is it quantum entanglement?). I've been helping Mrs Tiz with some of her family history and her mum's father was an engineer who was involved in building the tunnels at Dean Hill, Wiltshire, in WW2 for RN munition storage. I've been looking at maps and old photos. You'll see on the google view below that the road running all the way along the edge of the wooded hill is called The Hanging - perhaps derived in the same way as Hangland. The tunnels went into this hill. Originally there was a narrow gauge railway along the route. I've also posted an old photo too. There's more info here: History of Dean Hill Park

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Image

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 02 Feb 2020, 03:54

Lovely both of you. I love the way names metamorphose over the years, the place name specialists call it corruption but it's much more gentle than that. In Barlick we have Blue Pot Lane. That seems to me an obvious gentle change over the years but what from? That's the puzzle.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 02 Feb 2020, 11:12

Blue Pot Lane. I googled it and see there's a Blue Pot Lane in Grantham too. Perhaps a place where dyeing of fabric took place?

The names of minerals are interesting. For example, zinc sulphide is known as sphalerite and as zinc blende. The former comes from sphalerous, a Greek word meaning treacherous or deceitful which refers to the fact that it fooled early miners looking for lead. That property also led to the `blende' which is German for blind.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 02 Feb 2020, 12:36

Stanley wrote:
02 Feb 2020, 03:54
Lovely both of you
I thought so too. :smile:
Show me another website where such a 'conversation' can be had in such a civilised manner.
Yet more recruits are slow to arrive. However if it isn't broken don't fix it.

There - I've used 'conversation' and it's on my list of irritating words. Help. . . .!
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 02 Feb 2020, 21:14

Blue Pot lane leads towards 'Castle Row' and the area marked 'Ruin' behind the Grey Hound. If the ruin was the original fortified town then with a lot of imagination and dialect corruption You could start of with 'Blue Blut (german for blood) Lane. Where the gentry lived, then to Blue pot Lane.
I rest my case :biggrin2:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 03 Feb 2020, 03:12

That ruin has always puzzled me, probably a medieval cottage. The 'castle' was to the east P. One of these days something will pop up!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by chinatyke » 03 Feb 2020, 08:30

plaques wrote:
02 Feb 2020, 21:14
Blue Pot lane leads towards 'Castle Row' and the area marked 'Ruin' behind the Grey Hound. If the ruin was the original fortified town then with a lot of imagination and dialect corruption You could start of with 'Blue Blut (german for blood) Lane. Where the gentry lived, then to Blue pot Lane.
I rest my case :biggrin2:
I don't see why it has to be a corruption of anything. Why wouldn't Blue Pot Lane be where they made or used blue pots? If Blue Pot Lane led to an upper class area were blue (chamber or drinking) pots used by the upper class whilst the plebs used ordinary clay pots?

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 03 Feb 2020, 08:43

Blue Pot Lane doesn't really have many buildings on it to justify a manufacturing site. It lust leads to Manchester Rd (Tubber Hill)

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Blue Pot Lane.JPG
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 05 Feb 2020, 06:43

During the last few months I have been very glad that I have no problems dropping my trousers for just about everyone in the Northern Union. Evidently not everyone is as comfortable as I am. This triggered me to look up the etymology of embarrassment.
"Embarrass – Originally, in French, the word embarras meant a blockage or impediment to whatever you wanted to do. The word found its way into English just after Shakespeare's lifetime about 400 years ago. Knowing that embarras meant a blockage, we can easily break the word in two; em bar."
What a sensible and easily understood explanation.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 05 Feb 2020, 08:51

Another new word has surfaced. 'Desk topping'. I can't find it on the web but it's the professional term for an independent assessor deciding on what services or benefits someone is entitled to without necessarily ever having met them or having knowledge of their history. Generally regarded as bad practice and hence is a pejorative term.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 08 Feb 2020, 08:24

Just been reading on another site Rootschat re a query on a word in a 1785 will "dole" would appear to be a division of a field shared by several owners.
https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.p ... ;topicseen

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf » 08 Feb 2020, 08:39

The land at the side of the old highway up here was called the dole on old estate maps.

Later: I've just checked the map in question and realised that I have got that wrong and the Dole is an area of over 10 acres and must have been unenclosed land.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 09 Feb 2020, 04:34

You'll often find the word 'dole' applied to land in the old field names, particularly in old communal field systems or newly enclosed land. It signifies that the income from the particular piece was applied to a charitable or public use, often connected with the church. Some enclosures above Barlick were dedicated to supporting Queen Anne's Bounty to the upkeep of churches and augmenting the income of poor clergy. One at Bracewell was dedicated to providing ropes for the bells in the church. You can find many others if you search old field names and your example Wendy will be one of them. If it's the last enclosures in the early 19th century I'd suspect it is almost certainly for Queen Anne's Bounty. (LINK)
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 10 Feb 2020, 05:01

I listened to a Sky News report on storm Ciara. The lady said the winds were over 250mph and that the speed of the plane that broke to Atlantic record was a ground speed of 80mph. (That's right, eighty miles an hour).
She was correct about the speed of the jet stream but this wasn't made clear. Her report made it seem that this was the wind speed of the storm.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 10 Feb 2020, 14:26

We hear a lot of use of the word re-wilding from (environ)mentalist Mr George Monbiot and others. I'll leave Stanley to tell you why not, but it got me thinking in an idle moment, (most of my moments now) and remembering my tag line) - is there such a word as re-milding - if not there should be.

Indulge me. . . . :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by chinatyke » 10 Feb 2020, 14:45

Stanley wrote:
10 Feb 2020, 05:01
I listened to a Sky News report on storm Ciara. The lady said the winds were over 250mph and that the speed of the plane that broke to Atlantic record was a ground speed of 80mph. (That's right, eighty miles an hour).
She was correct about the speed of the jet stream but this wasn't made clear. Her report made it seem that this was the wind speed of the storm.
Sure she didn't say a ground speed of 800 miles per hour? If she said 80 she was wrong, it would take you 2 days to cross the Atlantic! :biggrin2:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Big Kev » 10 Feb 2020, 17:19

chinatyke wrote:
10 Feb 2020, 14:45
Stanley wrote:
10 Feb 2020, 05:01
I listened to a Sky News report on storm Ciara. The lady said the winds were over 250mph and that the speed of the plane that broke to Atlantic record was a ground speed of 80mph. (That's right, eighty miles an hour).
She was correct about the speed of the jet stream but this wasn't made clear. Her report made it seem that this was the wind speed of the storm.
Sure she didn't say a ground speed of 800 miles per hour? If she said 80 she was wrong, it would take you 2 days to cross the Atlantic! :biggrin2:
The plane hit a maximum speed of 825mph :-)
Kev

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 11 Feb 2020, 02:51

No, she said 80mph......
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by chinatyke » 11 Feb 2020, 03:08

:laugh5: :sad:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 11 Feb 2020, 10:45

Stanley wrote:
11 Feb 2020, 02:51
No, she said 80mph......
That's what you get when you listen to Sky News! :extrawink:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 12 Feb 2020, 03:16

Could be right. I was reviewing news clips on Youtube. In my defence I picked up on the mistake immediately.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 13 Feb 2020, 04:55

We have a new (To me) word. 'Graupel', the correct term for the small balls of hard snow we have been getting of late.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 14 Feb 2020, 04:20

Did everyone except me know about Graupel?
See THIS article about the Inuit having 50 different words for snow.....
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