DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 01 Apr 2020, 07:11

Is that right P? I hadn't heard that one. Anything to avoid stating the bald truth in plain language. I have always hated 'letting people go' instead of sacking them. It makes it sound as though they asked to be allowed to leave.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion » 01 Apr 2020, 20:35

Stanley wrote:
01 Apr 2020, 06:33
Rishi Sunak has changed our language. People are not 'laid off' but are 'furloughed'.
Laid Off used to be without pay
Furlough is With Pay

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion » 01 Apr 2020, 20:37

Stanley wrote:
20 Mar 2020, 13:02
Velcro memory very common on OG!
A new word has appeared.... 'bupofren'. Another consequence of sloppy speech and not bothering to enunciate clearly.
It appears some americans are refering to 'Rona (as if it is a named Hurricane)

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Big Kev » 01 Apr 2020, 20:49

Whyperion wrote:
01 Apr 2020, 20:35
Stanley wrote:
01 Apr 2020, 06:33
Rishi Sunak has changed our language. People are not 'laid off' but are 'furloughed'.
Laid Off used to be without pay
Furlough is With Pay
And being able to return once things have settled down. Some of us just have to work from home, I have to make myself look presentable for video conferencing...
Kev

A Resigned Observer

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 01 Apr 2020, 21:04

Those of us who remember with some fondness the Phil Silvers show - as Master Sergeant Ernie Bilko will be familiar with the word furlough - meaning leave. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy » 02 Apr 2020, 00:53

Big Kev re your video conferences.
You only have to look ‘presentable’ from your waist up.
You can still wear your Mickey Mouse daks and odd socks.... :laugh5:
I know I'm in my own little world, but it's OK... they know me here. :)

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 02 Apr 2020, 02:06

That was always my usage David.
Kev, put the cannon on the table, that'll distract them.
A bit later...... I heard a report from the US about a war on drugs being shipped by sea from Argentina to US ports. He described the drugs as being 'destinated for Florida. Do these people do this to give their reports more weight?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy » 30 Apr 2020, 01:49

Lockdown Lingo
“Coronacoaster”
The ups and downs of your mood during the pandemic. You’re loving lockdown one moment but suddenly feel anxiety the next.
It truly is “an emotional coronacoaster”.
I know I'm in my own little world, but it's OK... they know me here. :)

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 01 May 2020, 04:56

It's not so much the virus with me Cathy as not smoking and having a pile of tobacco in the sideboard! I don't know what sort of a coaster you'd call that!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 01 May 2020, 10:27

We got drenched in a heavy downpour yesterday. That had me thinking about the word drench and that led me on to wrench and clench. All three are extremes so I wonder if there's something about the `ench' that denotes strong?

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 02 May 2020, 03:40

When you dose a cow it was always referred to as 'a Drench'.
See THIS Etymology, like so many archaic words it has a complicated history and many meanings.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 03 May 2020, 12:47

Begging the question.

Nicely put by Anne Ashworth - a very wise woman from Clitheroe. :smile:

‘Begging the question’ is a very specific usage. Also known as a circular argument, it involves making a firm conclusion on the basis of an arguable proposition. For example: ‘Why did God make parasitic worms?’ This begs (or avoids) the question of whether God exists. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred the writer actually means to say ‘this raises/leads to the question . . .’ In this case the writer might have said: ‘ . . . making me wonder if they know something we don’t.’
Posted on February 8, 2020
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 04 May 2020, 03:37

Which begs the question "How many people know that?"
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 May 2020, 03:47

A word in a John Clare poem caught my eye; 'clapt'. It was in reference to a badger. Can't find it on the web but it is an archaic dialect word in Eastern England and Clare is referring to the badger's teeth. 'Clapt like a dog' means having similar teeth to a dog's.
Just used an old local word, 'fratching'. Have we done it already? I'll bet you all know what it means!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 11 May 2020, 21:10

I just looked at your 'clapt' . Some doubt I'd say. Perhaps it just means 'clapped' ? I think John Clare came from Cambridgeshire - he gets occasional mentions on the local TV.
See here. Badger - John Clare

PS - just had a Stewards Enquiry and another look. The word is used three times in the poem and I see your reference is the third. Some doubt has crept in, but I think the other two mean 'clapped' :smile:

Even later that night - and what about 'clapped eyes on it'. It's a mystery.

**********************************************
Now - I wasn't sure if this should be filed under bread or words.

I just realised that the words Ciabata and Chapatti are very similar in sound. As they say in Private Eye - 'I wonder if they are in any way related'. I think we should be told.

I think that Marco Polo might have been involved long ago. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 12 May 2020, 09:21

We used to call old cars `clapped out'.

I heard a sensible chap on the radio this morning saying we shouldn't be promoting social distancing, it should be described as physical distancing. Using the word social seems to imply you shouldn't socialise when really we should be promoting it but via the internet or at a safe physical distance.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 12 May 2020, 09:31

Clapt. looked up some old word usage and got the impression of Fasten, fix, hold etc.Clapt.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 12 May 2020, 12:59

Well done for finding that site - there's a lot more to the word clap than I thought. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion » 12 May 2020, 19:37

Internet likes related, the use of "uptick" in a couple of BBC Covid related posts, one for an increase in hospital admissions in the north east and east of england, the other an increase in on-line enquires into entering the NHS Nurse training and employment programms.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 24 May 2020, 12:00

Ian Blackford MP the leader of the Scottish Nationalist party in Westminster, has just used the phrase 'clear as mud' (twice) when he meant clear as day / crystal.

Should I let his ignorance inform my opinion of him going forward? I'm afraid it will. . . . :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 25 May 2020, 03:00

Malapropisms are becoming very common in media reporting.
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