STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 10 Jun 2015, 04:17

SAMUEL FOX & Co., STOCKBRIDGE WORKS CHIMNEY, DEEPCAR, NEAR SHEFFIELD.
Builder MR. MATTHEW BREARLEY.
Description. Octagonal brick shaft, erected in 1866: six months occupied.
Dimensions,
Height, including foundation 201' o"
from ground line to top 186' o'
Outside measurement over sides at foundation . . . . 19' 3"
Inside , .... 5' 9"
Outside at ground line 14ft 9ins.
Inside at ground line 5ft 9ins.
Outside at top 8ft 1ins; inside 5ft 9ins.
Foundation. Ashlar stone and brick.
Inner Shaft. A fire-brick lining is provided for 90' high in 9" work, with a 3" cavity between lining and shaft proper. Bricks. 250 m. used. Weight. Total, 1,000 tons.
Scaffold cost about £20. Batter. ¾ " to 1 yard, or 1 in 48.
Lightning Conductor. Copper wire.


BURY CORPORATION CHIMNEY.
Engineer, J. CARTWRIGHT, Borough Surveyor ; Builder, CAMMICK DENNIS, Bury.
Description, Circular brick.
Dimensions,
Height, including foundations 195' 9"
from ground line 180' o"
Outside diameter at ground line 17' 4"
Inside diameter at ground 11ft 4ins
Outside at top 8' 4"; Inside 6'
Height of inner brick shaft 30'. Inside diameter 6'
Foundation. The foundation bed is loamy clay, on which is laid a bed of concrete 32' square and 6' 9" high, the footings are stepped from 30' square to 17' 4" and have a height of 9'. Inner Shaft. An inner shaft 6' diameter is built parallel for a height of 30', the brickwork is 9" in thickness, the inner 4 ½ " of
which is fire-brick. Between the outside of the inner shaft and the inside of the chimney proper there is an annular space of 1ft 11ins at ground line. Thicknesses. The chimney is divided into four sections, each of 45' in height and having the respective thicknesses as follows, beginning at the ground line, 2' 3", 2', 18", 14".
The bottom section is stepped out externally to 3' in four set-offs, the highest being 1ft above ground line.
Cap. The moulded cap is of fire-clay. Construction. The scaffold was an inside one. Purposely made radiating bricks were used. The shaft has a regular
batter of ¾ " to the. yard, and was constructed in 1881, during the months of March to September inclusive. Lightning Conductor. Copper rod 213' long, cost of which fixed was £21. 6s. Cost. Complete, £750.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 11 Jun 2015, 05:48

BRADFORD CORPORATION CHIMNEY, HAMERTON STREET.
Engineer, J. H. Cox, Borough Surveyor ; Builders, Messrs. NAYLOR & SMITH, Bradford.
Description. Circular brick shaft, built 1880, in connection with "Fryer's Destructor" for town refuse.
Dimensions,
Total height, Including foundations 192' o"
Height from ground line to top 180' o"
Concrete foundation square 30'
Outside diameter at ground surface 14' 1"
Inside ,, ,, 9' 7"
Outside ,, at top 9'
Inside ,, 6' 8"
Thicknesses. The shaft is composed of four sections, the lowest being 2' 9" in thickness and the highest 1ft 2ins.
Fire-brick Lining. A fire-brick lining 8' internal diameter is built to a height of 45', apart from the shaft proper, thus leaving a cavity between.
Construction. The foundation rests upon tough clay of a somewhat blue colour, known locally as "Bowling Tough." The time occupied in building was nearly five months. Inside scaffold was used. The batter of shaft is ½ “ to a yard, or 1 in 72. The proportion of diameter to height above ground is as 1
to 127. Weight. 480 tons.


CHIMNEYS AT GEORGS MARTEN IRON WORKS, NEAR
OSNABRUCK.
Fig 39
1st Chimney. Dimensions. The first chimney, erected in 1857, has a height of 180'. Clear width at the bottom of 10' 9", top 7'.
Height of square basement built in sandstone 30'.
Octagonal shaft of bricks, the walls of which are constructed of six different thicknesses, consisting of 1 ½ bricks at the top, and of 4 bricks at the bottom. The bricks are 10" long.
2nd and 3rd Chimneys. Two other chimneys, 102' high, have also a square basement of sandstone, and an octagonal shaft of bricks, with a clear width of 4' at the top and of 6' 3" at the bottom ; the walls of these shafts are each 20" thick at the top and 30" thick at the bottom.
4th- Chimney. Built in four segments. A fourth chimney, erected in 1868, has a height of 102', a clear width of 7' at the top and 9' at the bottom. The shaft is built in four thicknesses of 1, 1 ½, 2, and 2 ½ bricks. The base is 18' in height, 3' 6" thick and built of sandstone. The shaft of this chimney is built from the base to the top in such a manner that it forms in the circumference four separate parts, which are simply brought in contact with each other. This arrangement is shown in diagram No. 39, in which the vertical joints are designated by letters a, b, c and d. This construction has been found to answer exceedingly well, and is recommended for chimneys exposed to various
temperatures, as, for example, in the case of chimneys connected with coke ovens, the gases of which are either applied to the firing of boilers, or are allowed to escape directly into the chimney in the event of the boilers being laid off for cleaning or repairs. The latter arrangements have, however, here been supplemented by the admission of cold air into the chimney together
with the hot gases.
5th Shaft. This chimney was built in 1870, and is sufficient for twenty Cornish boilers, and has a height of 120' and a circular shaft of a clear diameter of 10' at the top, and 10' 10" at the bottom. The thickness of the walls decreases in seven steps from four bricks at the base to one brick (10") at the top.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 12 Jun 2015, 04:01

DENS WORKS, DUNDEE, MESSRS. BAXTER BROTHERS.
Figs. 40, 41, 42 and 43. No. 3 Chimneys.
Description. Square brick pedestals; square taper brick shafts with pyramidal tops.
Erected . 1854 1844 1864
Boilers and Flues, No. 1 Chimney. This shaft carries away the products of combustion from No. 19 boilers, each with two furnaces, as follows :
15 boilers 63' below the base of chimney 225' from firing level to base of taper top. 4 boilers 86' below base and 248' to base of taper top.
The smoke and gases are conveyed from both of these ranges of boilers by a long sloping brick flue or tunnel mostly underground. When chimney No. 1 was designed it was of large area for the twelve boilers it was intended to serve, since then seven boilers have been added, making a total of nineteen. When it had only a few boilers connected with it soot collected inside to a considerable extent, and occasionally caught fire and burned out in sparks and showers of smut. As boilers were added the chimney became free from soot, and the inside surface of bricks clean. Mr. Peter Carmichael, in a paper read before the Institute of Engineers in Scotland, stated " In our practice invariably as more boilers and furnaces have been added to a chimney the
draught has been improved ; and it is obvious that if the opening in the chimney be too large compared with the whole of the openings at the dampers passing into it, the draught will be reduced."
Taper Tops. It will be seen from diagrams Nos. 42 and 43, illustrating shaft No. 1 that the tops are constructed in the form of a pyramid, by cross walls being built from each of the four corners ; the advantage of this arrangement is given by Mr. Carmichael as follows : " The taper top is found to answer the
purpose well, the smoke ascending from it very freely, especially when there is a breeze of wind. At such times the ordinary top is acted on like a key when blown into to make it whistle, the blasts of wind affecting very perceptibly the draught of the furnaces. In the taper top this is not much felt as the wind can
only blow into one or two of the four compartments at a time, and this still allows the other two to vent freely." In the discussion that followed Mr. Carmichael's paper the taper top, which diminishes the area at outlet, was opposed by several members, who advocated increasing the area at top.
Oscillations. At Dundee on Saturday, the i3th day of Feb., 1864, there was a violent storm of wind, which was at its height between 2 and 3 p.m. The tops of shafts Nos. 1 and 2 were blown down without injury to the shafts. The storm being a more violent one than any that had occurred for twenty years, Mr. Carmichael was anxious to see how the chimneys stood the gale ; the movement of No. 1 shaft was plainly visible, and was a steady rocking motion like the swing of a pendulum. The oscillation did not appear to exceed 12", and the observations gave a feeling of security as to the stability of the chimney.
The taper tops were re-built with bricks much heavier than those blown down, and were modelled so as to dovetail together, as shown in Figure 42. While the tops were off there was not much difference in the draughts, the cross-walls at top not being injured ; but there was more dark smoke than before, and after,
and it did not rise so freely, but in a breeze of wind fell down the leeward side and clung more to the chimney. These chimneys are still working satisfactorily, and have withstood several severe gales. The owners consider the taper construction an advantage, and the shafts "yield like a fishing
rod."
[tables of fuel consumption omitted]
The 123 square inches area of opening at fire bridge was adopted, after careful experiments. Mr. Carmichael stated in his paper he was of opinion that the narrow throat produces a higher temperature in the furnace, and the gases are more perfectly mixed and consumed while passing through the narrow opening, and said that at such a high temperature there was no discharge of small unconsumed cinders from the chimney. Temperature. The temperature of escaping gases is obtained by using small strips of the following metals :
Zinc, which melts at 736 Fah.
Lead, 612
Bismuth,, ,, 495 ,,
Tin, 442
Small bits of each of these, about 1"long x ¼ " broad, are pierced with a hole for suspension by a wire in the flue behind the damper, or at the bottom of the chimney, and the time occupied in melting recorded. Mr. Carmichael, from repeated observations under various circumstances, found that the temperature of the escaping products of these chimneys was uniformly 600F behind the dampers; tin melted at once, bismuth generally in less than a minute ; lead melted when the fires were in good condition, and zinc did not melt.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Tizer » 12 Jun 2015, 10:15

I've read about an archaeological dig currently in progress on the top of a tall cliff stack, exposing ancient village remains in dangerous positions on the very cliff edges. The stack is only accessible at low tide and mostly sheer cliff face. Sounds like a job for steeplejacks! Which makes me wonder whether any steeplejacks have ever taken up extreme archaeology?

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Invernahaille » 12 Jun 2015, 20:59

Does that include Stanley? LOL.

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 13 Jun 2015, 03:04

Ian, they do use rope access. And yes, Robert is right, when I was climbing stacks and crawling through holes it was archaeology.
(I still don't understand LOL....)
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Invernahaille » 13 Jun 2015, 16:53

Stanley. LOL = Laugh Out Loud

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 14 Jun 2015, 03:15

CROSSNESS, METROPOLITAN BOARD OF WORKS.
Engineer Sir JOSEPH BAZALGETTE.
Built Commenced May, 1863 ; Completed January, 1865.
Description. Square brick shaft with curved base on pedestal, with stone mouldings, surmounted by ornamental iron cap.
Dimensions,
Height, including foundations, to summit of iron cap 246' 7"
from ground line to top of stone moulding under iron cap . .177' o"
Foundation bed below ground line 40' o"
Outside dimensions, concrete foundation 30' 2" X 28' 6"
OD measurement at ground line square 26' 6"
OD measurement parallel shaft square 12'
Inside diameter, parallel flue circumference 8' 3"
Foundation. Foundation bed is 24' below ordnance datum. The concrete block is 16' in height, and upon it are laid two courses of 6" York landings before commencing footings to shaft.
Fire-brick Lining. The shaft is lined with Stourbridge fire-bricks for a height of 40'. Materials. Cement concrete (6 to 1 and 8 to 1), 800 cubic yards ; bricks, about 400,000. Men. The bricklayers employed varied, but when above
the curved portion 4 were engaged on the shaft. Progress. Varied very much, but the general run was 10' per week. Scaffolding Outside, cost about £600.
Cost. Approximate, ,4,000.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Tripps » 14 Jun 2015, 10:51

I think this is worth a link. Interesting to compare and contrast the contributions made to life by Sir Joseph Bazalgette, and his g.g grandson Sir Peter Bazalgaette, who gave us 'Big Brother'. :smile:

Crossness pumping station.
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 15 Jun 2015, 03:48

Dead right David. He built so well that the system coped with increasing flows until now and I think they have started on a new outfall sunning under the river.

WOOLWICH ARSENAL, GUN FACTORY CHIMNEY.
Description. Square pedestal, octagonal shaft.
Dimensions,
Height from ground line to top 170'
Height of pedestal above ground 30'
Outside measurement of base at ground surface . . . 18' 9"
OD bottom of shaft 13' 1". Inside, 9' 4"
Outside at top 5' 6". Inside 4'
Construction. The chimney is built up in 5 sections. The heights and thickness are as follows :
1st section . . pedestal 30' high 3 bricks thick.
2nd….shaft…..50ft……2 ½ bricks
3rd ……………..30 ft ….2 bricks
4th ……………...30ft…..1 ½ bricks.
5th ……………..30ft…….1 brick.
170ft above ground.
Cap. Stone, supplied by S. Trickett, Millwall, London.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 16 Jun 2015, 06:52

MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A., AMERICAN PRINT WORKS, FALLS
RIVER, CHIMNEY SHAFT AND VENTILATOR.
Figs. 44, 45, 46 and 47.
Engineer . . . J. A. MILLER, New York.
Height from ground line to top 160' o"
Chimney proper internal diameter throughout .... 6' o"
Hot Chamber. It will be seen upon reference to diagram No. 46 that at the base of the shaft an enlargement or "hot chamber" 20' high x 10' diameter is formed, into which the gases delivered by the flues are discharged. The object of this chamber is to allow the currents from the flues to be gradually
diverted upwards, and is of more advantage when two or more flues discharge into the same chimney, and where there are consequently conflicting currents. This chamber is vertically of elliptical form, being contracted from 10' diameter at centre to 5' diameter at outlet. Chimney Proper. The circular chimney proper commences from the top of the hot chamber, and is internally 6' diameter throughout its entire height. The brickwork is increased in
thickness downwards by external offsets, as see diagram No. 46, so as to avoid internal projections, which, in the engineer's opinion, cause eddies, and obstruct the upward flow of the gases. Outer Ventilating Shaft. The outer shaft is octagonal upon a square base, about 20' high. Four of the eight sides project for the width of a brick beyond the line of the others (see Figure 47). This projection, it is said, besides improving the architectural effect of the shaft, enables the work to be executed with fewer cut bricks than are ordinarily required in octagonal or circular shafts. Between the exterior of the inner shaft and the interior of the outer one there is an annular flue of an area
of 2,200 square inches, which is used for ventilation purposes, being specially suitable by reason of the heated state of the air in it, caused by the high temperature of the gases in the inner shaft.
Cap (Fig. 45). The inner shaft is terminated a little below the top of the outer one, and by piercing the latter with openings the wind passes through and impinges upon the sides of the cap of the inner shaft, the shape of which causes it (the
wind) to be deflected upwards, and thus, by the action of induced currents, assists the draught rather than diminishes it, as is the case with the ordinary top, where it acts to a certain extent as a damper and checks the draught.
The cast iron caps to both the inner and outer shafts are built up in sections, each of which is of such shape that its centre of gravity falls outside the inner line of the bases of the sections, and the sections thus tend to fall together and form a kind of arch. Each section is connected to that adjoining it by two bolts, but from the shape given to the sections they will maintain their position, even if the bolts are corroded away. The sections are provided at their bases with flanges, which grip the shaft both within and without, as see Fig. 45.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 17 Jun 2015, 04:43

MR. W. D. BARKER, PATENT BRICK WORKS, WORCESTER.
Architect, F. CHAMBERLAIN, Barnsley ; Builder, V. D. BARKER.
Built in 1869, from March to July (about four months).
Description. Circular brick chimney, outer and inner shafts.
Dimensions
Height, including foundations 164'
from ground surface to top 160'
Diameter of circular brick foundation 24'
Outside diameter at top of footings 13' 10"
Inside diameter 7' 7 ½ "
Outside diameter under cap 6' 9"
Extreme diameter of cap . . . 10' 6"
Inside 4' 6"
Foundation. The foundation bed is rock marl, 4' below ground surface, upon which the brick footings commence, and are carried up to ground level.
Construction. The Outer Shaft from top of footings to a height of 22' is of 14" work, and from thence for a height of 110ft (28' from top) is 9" in thickness. The alteration from 14" to 9" work is made by an external set back of half a brick, thus giving the appearance of a pedestal. The Inner Shaft for a height of 10' from footings is in 9" work, thence to within 28' from top is 4 ½ " in thickness; at this height the outer and inner shafts merge into one, and are
continued in 14" solid work to under cap. The inner shaft is every 10' in height bonded to the outer one by No. 12 radial brick ties. The shaft was built by day labour, under the supervision of Mr. Barker. Brickwork. 92,000 purposely made red bricks 9" X 4 ½ " X 3 ½ '' were used in the construction of this shaft, costing 26/- per m. The whole of the bricks in the exterior shaft were made to suit the radius of the stack. The lime and sand were ground together
in a mill, and used almost hot. Bond. Three stretchers to one header. Weight. 390 tons = .86 ton pressure per square foot on the foundation bed. Batter. The batter of the outer shaft is 3/4 “ per yard, that of the inner shaft is 3/8" per yard. Scaffold. Inside. Duty. One boiler and one Hoffman's brick kiln.
Cap. The cap is of brick formed by a course of round end bricks 18" X 6" x 4", then two courses of white bricks cornered out, then two courses of ordinary red bricks, then a course of round ends 18" x 9 ½ " X 6", then gathered in and finished with half round coping 14" x 7". This work is in cement, and the
large bricks were cut to the radius of the cap. Mr. Barker says this cap gives a pleasing finish to the shaft, and is excellent in its simplicity, and he cannot understand why heavy cast iron
caps are adopted when a better effect can be obtained in brickwork. Lightning Conductor. Copper, costing about £11 fixed.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 18 Jun 2015, 05:11

WROUGHT IRON CHIMNEY, MESSRS. FRANCIS & Co., THE NINE
ELMS CEMENT WORKS, CLIFFE CREEK, ROCHESTER.
Erected, 1878 ; Designed by Mr. V. DE MICHELLE, C.E. ; Constructed by Messrs. FIELDING & PLATT, Gloucester.
Description. The shaft is circular and parallel throughout, and is constructed as follows :
Dimensions,
Height from ground line to top 160' o"
External diameter throughout 5' o"
Internal diameter 4' 6"
Wrought Iron Plates. The plates vary in thickness downwards, from ¼ in to 3/8 in. The shaft is lined with 3" fire-brick its entire height. Wind Stays. The chimney is stayed against the wind by No. 4, 3 ¾ “ steel guy ropes. Duty. This chimney was erected over the centre one in a row of nine cement kilns, which are all connected to shaft by a wrought iron horizontal flue 4' in diameter. Two additional kilns have since been added, and the chimney now carries off the gases from eleven cement kilns. Chimney Base. Round the outside of centre kiln on ground level is fixed a cast iron curb or base plate. On this base stand
four cast iron standards or supports, having their lower ends butting into and secured to base plate. These standards incline inwards until their upper ends meet to support a cast iron circular chimney base, which forms the top of the centre kiln. The wrought iron chimney proper commences from top of this
circular cast iron base, directly over which the 4' horizontal flue is connected to shaft. Construction (Novel Erection). A timber stage was erected at about level of kiln tops, and upon this stood the rivet fires. Four winches were worked on this stage, and to them were led guy ropes, after passing round blocks at convenient distances. A hydraulic press with a 4' stroke was then fixed over the centre kiln, and the top length of 20', which had previously
been riveted up on the ground and raised to the stage level, was placed upon the ram. The ram was then pumped up, and the 20' length raised a height of 4', the guy ropes being slackened out to the required extent, as the 20' length gradually rose. A 4' ring of plating was then riveted on with snap head rivets,
and the usual lap. The ram was then again pumped up, and the now 24' length raised the necessary height ; another ring of plates was then riveted on, and the operation repeated until the chimney had reached its required altitude.
The Engineer says "The chimney answers its purpose admirably." On a bad foundation he would recommend the construction of an iron shaft, but on a good one, decidedly brick. Cost. About £1,000, including long wrought iron flues.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 19 Jun 2015, 08:36

Here's a couple of interesting ones.......

COTTON FACTORY, MEXICO.
Description. Chimney built of apparently sun-dried bricks, in use over twelve years, and in excellent condition. This shaft was built by Indians, is symmetrical, and appears to be well constructed.
Height about 160'
Bricks, size of 10" X 3" X 7"
The above particulars were given at a meeting of the American Society of Civil Engineers, March 5th, 1884. At the same meeting a chimney was mentioned as being in successful use in Pennsylvania, U.S.A., which is generally known
as the “crinoline chimney," being constructed of old rails.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 20 Jun 2015, 04:55

This one is interesting, a Burnley builder erecting a stack in Russia....

MR. SHEKOLDEN'S PAPER MILL, ADESHAVO (NEAR THE TOWN
OF KINESHMA), KOSTROMA GOVERNMENT, RUSSIA.
Engineer .... V. T. GREGORY, Moscow.
Description. Circular wrought iron shaft, brick pedestal.
Erected March, 1874.
Dimensions, .
Total height, including foundation 170'
Height of brick pedestal above ground 14'
Height of W.I. shaft 62 Archines = 144' 8"
Total height from ground to top 158' 8"
Diam. inside, at foundation, pedestal, and top of shaft 2 Archines = 4' 8"
Outside measurement at brick foundation footings 11' 8"
Pedestal outside measurement at ground surface 9' 4" at top '7' o"
Thickness. The shaft is circular and parallel all the way up, and composed of plates varying in thickness downwards from 3/16” to 3/8”
Duty. This chimney carries off the gases from the flues of five boilers, which give in the aggregate 250 nominal hp. Wood fuel is used, and the chimney draught travels some distance and passes round a large wrought iron tube placed in flue as a water heater to feed boilers, consequently the heat at
bottom of shaft is not so intense as to require any fire-brick lining to protect the shaft.
Foundation. It was the intention of the owner to build a brick chimney, but finding the ground very bad he decided to have one in wrought iron. The foundation is of brickwork on gravel, and is carried to 11' 4" below ground level. Construction. The chimney was made at contractor's works, and brought to the mill in three parts and riveted together near site. The sizes of rivets used were 5/8" diameter in lower portion and 3/8" diameter at top, the lap of plates being about 2 ¼ “. The appliances used for lifting were a pair of sheer legs and two pairs of blocks. The legs were built on ground with pine timber cut in the adjoining woods, and bound together with wrought iron hoops and bolts ; then taken to pieces after each timber had been marked to its own place. The legs were then removed to the chimney site and erected so as to lean over centre of foundation. The blocks were then hooked to, and the
tube lifted in bulk and placed on its brick pedestal. The erection was carried out by Mr. J. P. Moorhouse, of Burnley, England, and the time occupied in lifting, after all preparations had been made, was 15 hours. Mr. Moorhouse states "wrought iron chimneys are very common in Russia, and seem to give general satisfaction. They are used principally for small or medium sized works of all sorts, the first cost being much in their favour." The Russian climate being much drier is more favourable to wrought iron shafts than the English.

[SCG note: I enquired about Moorhouse and got this from Susan Halstead at Burnley Library: Thank you for this fascinating nugget of information which I will add to our Local Studies collection. We have checked our various sources of information and found a reference to a James Moorhouse, a builder, in the 1871 census returns. In the Barrett's trade directory for 1872 there is an entry for the same man but no references can be found in the directories for 1868, 1879, 1887, 1893, 1896 or 1899. We hold an index to the records for Burnley Cemetery which include an entry for a James Moorhouse who was interred in 1899. There is no proof that this is the same gentleman as the J.P Moorhouse below but there is a possibility that it is him.]
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 21 Jun 2015, 05:33

ABBEY MILLS PUMPING STATION, METROPOLITAN BOARD OF
WORKS.
Engineer, SIR JOSEPH BAZALGETTE. Built, 1867 ; time occupied in building brick shaft from top of stone base to underside of stone head, 20th July, 1867, to 9th Nov., 1867.
Description. Octagonal brick shaft with curved base on massive square stone moulded pedestal ; top formed of stone, surmounted by large ornamental iron cap. Dimensions. Taken from contract drawing, Height, including foundations to summit of iron cap . .212' o"
Foundation below ground line 21' o"
Height from ground line to top of stone cap . . . .158' 3"
Height of pedestal above ground line 30' 9"
Outside measurement, square concrete foundation ... 43' o"
square brick footings 39' 6"
at ground line 30' 6"
top of pedestal 17' 6"
top of shaft under cap . . . . 10' 3"
Inside throughout, except at set offs . . 8' 0"
Foundation. The foundation bed is 6' below Ordnance Datum. The concrete layer is 6' deep and 37' 6" x 37' 6" ; it is, however, carried out on each side 2' 9" to form foundation to base buttresses. Upon the concrete the footings are constructed for a height of 4', having four steps and set offs. Shaft. From pedestal to underside of cap is constructed in three sections, as follows :
1st section, including curved base 40' high tapering from 4' 4 ½ " to 1' 10 ½ " thick. 2nd 39' tapers to 1' 6". 3rd 39' tapers to 1’ 1 ½” in thickness.
Brickwork. From stone base to underside of stone head, Bricklayers 525 days.
Labourers 590 days time. This equals a cost of £8 per rod for labour only.
Portland Stone. Stone cap, 900 cubic feet or 60 tons, supplied by S. Trickett, Millwall. Time for raising and fixing only: Masons 72 days. Labourers 144 days. This equals about 1s. 2d. per cubic foot.
Scaffolding, &c. The means used for raising the bricks and stone on shaft were by a small donkey engine, chains being fixed round wheels at top and bottom of shaft, after reaching 50' in height. No. of scaffold poles used: Shaft 428
Barrow lift 18. 446 total.
No. of cords used:
Standards 324
Barrow lift 54
Braces 216
Ledgers 544
1138 total cords.
Iron Cap. Weight, 27 tons. This cap was ultimately removed during the examination and repair of top of shaft in November, 1883, owing to the chimney being very much fissured by cracks. The masonry at top was strengthened by three additional braces of iron.
Stanley Challenger Graham
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 22 Jun 2015, 03:55

SALFORD CORPORATION SEWAGE WORKS.
Fig. 74
Engineer, ARTHUR JACOBS, M.I.C.E. ; Builders, S. W. FILLING & Co. ; Built, 1883.
Description. Octagonal brick shaft, on square ornamented pedestal.
Dimensions,
Total height, including foundations 180' 6"
Height from ground line to top 156' 6"
Height of pedestal square and parallel 40' o"
Outside measurement at ground line 17' 6", Inside , 5' 3"
base of octagonal shaft . . . . 1 1' 6" Inside 6ft.
Outside at top 8ft 4in. Inside, 5ft 3in.
Foundation Bed. Red sandstone.
Construction, Thicknesses, &c. Pedestal, 40' high, five bricks thick, exclusive of fire-brick. Shaft 1st section 34' 6" high 3 ½ bricks. 2nd 31' 7", 3 bricks. 3rd. 31ft 7in, 2 ½ bricks. 4th 18' 10", 2 bricks.
Height from ground line . . . .156' 6'
The chimney was built slowly. The workmen constructed about 2' in height daily, and when each 6' was built the work was left to rest for a couple of days.
Ordinary bricks, laid to Flemish bond, used in construction ; best pressed bricks used outside, and stock bricks on the inside. At angles purposely-made bricks were employed. No hoop iron used. Fire-brick Lining. This shaft has a fire-brick lining 40' high, 20' one brick thick and 20' ½ brick, 1" cavity being left between pedestal and fire-brick lining. Scaffold. Inside scaffold was used, consisting of No. 4 putlogs, covered with boards for platform. A small set of shear legs above. Duty. The flues from No. 4 boilers are connected to shaft ;
the boilers are 27' long x 7' diameter, with two flues to each boiler.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Travis » 22 Jun 2015, 20:21

11540834_607868586016880_8451888075252887903_n.jpg
From a local Facebook page from Middleton. Do you know any of the faces Stanley?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 23 Jun 2015, 03:56

Not sure with my bad eyes but the lad on the right looks like Jason........
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Steeplejerk » 23 Jun 2015, 19:11

In the picture from left to right,Eric Pickstone,Ken Pickstone ans Russell Pickstone from Heywood,all dead now !!
Work,the curse of the drinking class (oscar wilde)

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 24 Jun 2015, 03:18

Bloody hell Tom, we're getting old.... Even you!

MILE END SPOOL COTTON MILL, EAST NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A.
Engineers . . . BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY, New York.
Description. Octagonal brick shaft, on square brick base, surmounted by ornamental cap.
Dimensions,
Height above footings 161' 6"
above ground line 150' o"
Height of square base above ground 30' o"
Outside measurement, parallel square base 17' o"
OD foot of shaft 16' 6" at top 12' o"
Inside throughout, except at off sets . . 10' o"
Pedestal. The square base extends 11' 6" below and 30' above ground line. It measures outside 17' x 17' its entire height, and the walls are 32" in thickness.
Shaft. Above the square base the shaft is gradually stepped at the corners until the shaft is octagonal in form. It is built in four sections, as follows :
1st section, including stepping . 30' high 24" thick.
2nd 30'….. 20"
3rd 30'…… 16"
4th including cap . . . 30' ….12".
Inner Shaft. An inner shaft is constructed for a height of 80' above ground line, as follows :
1st section 50' high 9" thick.
2nd 30'……. 4 ½ "
It is 10' diameter inside, thus leaving a cavity at the angles between itself and the brickwork of square pedestal and octagonal shaft. A wall across the circular flue at the base of the chimney, is built diagonally for the purpose of giving a larger and easier line from the horizontal to the vertical flue. It is also intended to prevent the two currents of gases from interfering with each
other until they begin to travel in the same direction. Batter. 1 in 53.3.
Duty and Flues. The boiler plant when complete will be composed of two sets or divisions of 1,248 hp. each. The right hand division remains vacant for the present, the one at the left being all that will be necessary for some time to come. The entire plant will consist of six independent batteries of boilers.
Each battery is composed of two independent boilers of 208hp each. The flue for conveying the products of combustion from the boilers to the chimney is double, and the gases can either be thrown into a direct flue underneath the economizer to the chimney, or can be passed up through an 8' x 5' damper,
thence across the economizer into the stack. Plan. Experience has demonstrated that it is best to divide the economizer into two parts, as it makes the flues more direct, and allows one to be in use while the other is being cleaned or repaired, as may occur in an emergency. Furthermore, this arrangement makes a more symmetrical plant. The ground level of the boiler-house is the street level, and a 7' door in front of the boilers is built for dumping the coal from the street directly into the boiler-room.
Cap. The cap commences 12'from the top, and is constructed for a height of 8' in brickwork, the remaining 4' being in stone, the whole forming a neat but ornamental cap.
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Invernahaille » 24 Jun 2015, 21:15

Well Played Tom!

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Steeplejerk » 24 Jun 2015, 21:22

Haha Stanley,tell me about it...just been looking at the picture again and it dawned on me the photo was taken in Heywood ,the chimney in the background is Hooley bridge mill,the council estate is called Back o'th moss and the school is Bamford road now called Mossfield primary if its still there,so the chimney must be at ames crosta .Sadley Russell (far right) had a young son called Bradley who got killed when he was only about 9/10 playing on ames crostas roof when it was derelict in the early 1980s.......I reakon the photo above must have been around 1966..
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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Steeplejerk » 24 Jun 2015, 21:23

HAHA,Cheers Robert !!
Work,the curse of the drinking class (oscar wilde)

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Re: STEEPLEJACK'S CORNER 2012

Post by Stanley » 25 Jun 2015, 03:47

EASTBOURNE WATER WORKS CHIMNEY.
Fig. 76.
Engineer, G. A. WALLIS, M.I.C.E. ; Architect, H. CURREY, F.R.I.B.A.
Built, 1881-2 ; 5 months occupied in building.
Description. Square brick shaft, buttressed.
Dimensions,
Total height, including foundation 165' o"
Height from ground line to top 150' o"
Concrete foundation square 30'. 8' deep.
Outside measurement at ground surface 12' o"
Inside 6' o"
Outside ,, at top 6' o"
Inside 3' o"
Foundation Bed. Chalk. Buttresses. This shaft has two buttresses on each side, making a total of eight ; they are 3' in thickness, and extend to a height of 34'. Batter. 1 in 50. Materials. 134,850 bricks were used in the construction of
this chimney. Weight. 542 tons. Scaffold. Outside scaffolding was used at a cost of £101. 55. Lightning Conductor. Copper tape.
Stanley Challenger Graham
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"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

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